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User avatar   Uber Modder Uber ModderMember since: 05.11.2011, 16:26Posts: 1965Location: Czech Republic Likes: 44
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 20.03.2012, 17:13 
For the glass, make sure after setting up diffuse texture change shader from "Illum" to -> "Glass". It also take some practice to get a really nice window texture and overall atmosphere :)

  Beginner BeginnerMember since: 19.08.2011, 14:50Posts: 2 Likes: 0
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 23.03.2012, 13:04 
when i set the shader from illum to glass, the texture isnt visible :/
User avatar   Uber Modder Uber ModderMember since: 05.11.2011, 16:26Posts: 1965Location: Czech Republic Likes: 44
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 23.03.2012, 15:13 
Quote by Ravenhead:
when i set the shader from illum to glass, the texture isnt visible :/

You have to also setup an advanced shader parameters and opacity
  Beginner BeginnerMember since: 29.03.2012, 10:30Posts: 1 Likes: 0
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryEngine3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 29.03.2012, 10:34 
Quote by bac9-flcl:
1. Getting Started
basic workspace & viewport setup

.


Thank you very much! I just find them for times~ ;)

mod edit : Please quote properly in the future. I shortened the quote by 90%
Hi and welcome to the forums btw ;-)
-lavizh
  Beginner BeginnerMember since: 30.07.2011, 16:43Posts: 10 Likes: 0
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 10.04.2012, 18:52 
hey anyone know a solution for this?:


in sketchup it all looks normal but when i import it into cryengine, some walls seem to be invisible ?( anyone can help please? :)
Attachments:

st.jpg
User avatar   Uber Modder Uber ModderMember since: 05.11.2011, 16:26Posts: 1965Location: Czech Republic Likes: 44
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 10.04.2012, 19:41 
Quote by MasterP:
hey anyone know a solution for this?:


in sketchup it all looks normal but when i import it into cryengine, some walls seem to be invisible ?( anyone can help please? :)

You need to make the walls more "fat". Push them so in CE3, they will be visible :)
User avatar   News Posters News PostersMember since: 04.12.2007, 03:23Posts: 10409Location: Hamar, NorwayStatus: Online Likes: 514
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 10.04.2012, 19:51 
Also tick 2 sided under Advanced TAB in the Material Editor in CE3.


 
 
 

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  Beginner BeginnerMember since: 30.07.2011, 16:43Posts: 10 Likes: 0
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 10.04.2012, 20:22 
Yay thank you so much! I've been searching for a solution the whole day :D
cheers
MasterP
  Beginner BeginnerMember since: 22.08.2011, 14:56Posts: 29 Likes: 0
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 16.04.2012, 00:40 
I think you have to reverse faces. Open SketchUp, select the face(s)that you don't see and right click, "reverse faces". Than re-export in sdk.

Example:

Image
User avatar   Uber Modder Uber ModderMember since: 05.11.2011, 16:26Posts: 1965Location: Czech Republic Likes: 44
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 16.04.2012, 06:12 
@shamnadhoh He said that our tips helped him
  Trainee TraineeMember since: 18.05.2009, 19:01Posts: 152Location: United States Likes: 6
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 16.04.2012, 16:09 
Quote by bac9-flcl:
Nothing special.

I determine which surfaces (or just non-unfolded parts in certain rotation) I'll need to create the texture. Then I determine the minimal size of a square they can fit in, create a box from it, and manually compose the texture layout there.

Image

In some complicated cases, e.g. when I need a continuous unwrapped surface to place on my map, I use the simple "Unfold" plugin.

Image

Then I switch off perspective, set the view from the side I need, and bake that into some high resolution image. Usually x3000 for x1024 textures, and x1500 for x512 textures, but precise values don't matter, just make sure it's not a screengrab with line resolution lower than you'll need on your final texture.

Image

I open that image in Photoshop and crop it into square: as you remember, layout was composed in this shape, and that allows me to do this operation without deforming the image. Then I reduce the resulting image from what I've got to the resolution I need (usually something like 2438x2438 downscaled to e.g. 1024x1024).

Now I can start working on the texture. Image that was just made is actually a scheme which you can just set to the Multiply mode with some appropriate transparency, and place above all your layers for reference. Then we get a texture:

Image

Then I apply the texture onto my model, which is, thanks to SketchUp interface, incredibly fast and easy.

Extremely important thing to mention there is that I almost NEVER scale anything in my texture layout. It's often tempting to scale something to make it fit into layout better, especially if there is not enough space in the square area you've determined, but I avoid that as much as possible. Why? Here's the thing: I always make use of SketchUp materials scale parameter.

For example, I made a square layout. Apart from baking it into an image for Photoshop work, I also remember the size of that square precisely. In this example it was 1.57x1.57m. When I import my finalized texture into the model to apply it onto surfaces, I will set precisely the same size in material properties. That will make the texturing process by an order of magnitude easier, because all the surfaces on my texture will be precisely real-scaled, and texture mapping will be reduced to extremely easy process of aligning object surfaces with proper parts of a texture. Continuous unfolded surfaces are even easier - you precisely apply your texture on one of them, and then finish the rest in a matter of seconds with sampling feature I've mentioned in my texturing tutorial.

As you understand, if you will use scaled parts in your layout, final texturing will be harder because one default size won't do anymore: you'll have to manually scale the texture on some of your surfaces, which is always less precise. Also, it's not that good from the point of pixel density.

Still, uniform scale, especially if applied to simple parts like doors, is appropriate in many layouts, because it's relatively easy to control. It's not that hard to stretch a picture of a door from your layout a bit to fit into a slightly bigger doorway, even though with each part like this, the texturing of your object will take more time.

The thing you'll NEVER want to use in your layouts is non-uniform scaling and especially any other kind of distortion. You'll never place such texture parts back on your surfaces in a precise way, not to mention that distorted or non-uniform scaled texture mapping can't be sampled over the edges, rendering it impossible to easily apply continuous sequences of unfolded faces.

It is the only one real limitation of this workflow. As you remember, most layouts of complicated organic objects feature continuous areas with countless complicated distortions used to fit the surface into 2D space. Like that:

Image

You can't do anything like that in SketchUp because there are no tools to apply such a texture back to surfaces. It's easier for major DCC packages users, because when they work on UV layouts there, they are linked to the surfaces from the beginning, so you can distort the hell out of it however you see fit - texture is already applied anyway. In contrast, SketchUp never featured any kind of connection like that - our layouts are simple geometry, we're working with pixel data only. Then we manually apply the resulting texture to surfaces, trying to be as precise as possible.

Basically, my workflow is a manually executed imitation of simple hardsurface UV mapping methods. You're doing the same thing, just without the help of automatic link between your layout and texture mapping. Which means you can't execute really complicated cases like organic objects, but still, can rock it quite well with most hardsurface geometry.

Image


Would you mind uploading an example file that I could look at, just so I can grasp the general idea? I would help if I could see your texture map and how it directly applies to your model.


Image
  Beginner BeginnerMember since: 17.04.2012, 06:55Posts: 1 Likes: 0
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 20.04.2012, 06:56 
I found there is no such folder as game\objects\ folder in my cryenging 3 sdk which I just downloaded . So where should I output my model?
User avatar   News Posters News PostersMember since: 04.12.2007, 03:23Posts: 10409Location: Hamar, NorwayStatus: Online Likes: 514
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 20.04.2012, 09:42 
Models go under Objects, you havn't unpacked your PAK files?


 
 
 

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User avatar   Beginner BeginnerMember since: 14.12.2008, 15:22Posts: 77Location: Germany Likes: 0
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 21.04.2012, 01:12 
User avatar   Beginner BeginnerMember since: 24.12.2011, 17:18Posts: 20 Likes: 1
 

 Post Topic: Re: Google SketchUp for CryENGINE 3 | Extensive tutorials
PostPosted 02.06.2012, 22:16 
I don't know if it has been posted here already cal or if you knew about this but.. about that FP16. Errors become more noticeable the further you go from the origin point of your model. Now when you export your model SketchUp automatically puts your origin point in the left down corner of your model. Meaning all data on the right top side will be the least accurate and most prone to errors. At least in big models. To check the origin point simply go to Window -> Model Info -> Components and click on Show Component Axes. You'll see the axes are not in the centre of your model.

So when you rightclick your component and pick "Change Axes", you can put your origin point in the centre of your model. When you export it now it will be more detailed and contain less geometry errors as you usually would.

I've tested it on big ass models and it does work. So yeah.. if this was already posted here please ignore this post. Just wanted to help out the SketchUp users a bit!